Acta Scientific Agriculture (ASAG)(ISSN: 2581-365X)

Review Article Volume 6 Issue 7

Futuristic Agriculture (Organic Farming) in India: A Review

Pasupala Pavani1*, Patel Aditi Devendra Kumar1 and U Bharath22

1Genetics and Plant Breeding, Lovely Professional University, India
2Msc Ag, Lovely Professional University, India

*Corresponding Author: Pasupala Pavani, Genetics and Plant Breeding, Lovely Professional University, India.

Received: April 04, 2022; Published: June 20, 2022

Abstract

Agriculture covers around 38% of the land surface of the earth, it is a major source to greenhouse gas emissions, species extinction, agrochemical contamination, and soil degradation, even though it offers increasing amounts of food and other items. Most of these environmental impacts are caused by agricultural land, which accounts for around 12% of total land cover. It will be difficult to produce more food of 9 to 10 billion people by 2050 while also conserving the ecosystem. Our best chance of overcoming this big challenge and guaranteeing future food and environmental security is to adopt truly sustainable agricultural techniques on a large scale. Worries about commercial agriculture's longevity have sparked interest in alternative agricultural systems such as organic, diversified, and conservation agriculture. Organic farming produces lower yields on average than conventional farming, which constitutes just for 1% of worldwide agricultural production. If majority of the farmers adopt to organic techniques, the observed production differences may widen even more due to increased expertise needs. Organic agriculture's massive adaptation will result in further damage to natural resources as well as higher output prices, making food less accessible for poor customers in developing nations. Organic foods are in growing market because people believe they are healthier, tastier, and more ecologically friendly than conventional items. Organic agriculture has an enormous role to play in the development of appropriate agricultural systems, but no one technique will be able to feed the world safely. Instead, a combination of organic and perhaps other new agricultural practises is required.

Keywords:Organic Farming; Conservation; Conventional; Pesticides

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Citation

Citation: Pasupala Pavani., et al. "Futuristic Agriculture (Organic Farming) in India: A Review". Acta Scientific Agriculture 6.7 (2022): 25-31.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 Pasupala Pavani., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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